Is postmodernism developed enough to be defined?

Charles

I make my money as a web developer at a tech security company. I chase my passions as a director for the Dallas Junior Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Over the last couple of years I've come to love this city, and I want to see it be as great as it can be. Why am I here?

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3 Responses

  1. Alan Noble says:

    I suspect that we'll see a return to modernism. In fact, I would cite the increasing importance of the New Atheists as an example of the public acceptance of scientific positivism/materialism as the defining cultural epistemology. While most academics I know would reject this movement as untenable after the collapse of Modernity, there seems to be a fairly powerful popular movement in this direction. Because it's primarily popular, it seems to totally ignore past ideas (like postmodernism's powerful critique of modernism).

    p.s. I hope I'm wrong.

    • Charles says:

      I hope you’re wrong, too. There’s a lot wrong with Modernism, and I think that once we’ve shed it, Christians throughout the West will wonder how the faith survived the last 350 years. All of that glory goes to God.

      I think what we’re seeing with positivism is the lag that is inevitable from movements passing from academic to popular audiences. It’s only been a couple of generations since logical positivism was considered strong, and it will take some time for the rest of society to figure out what Anthony Flew tried to tell everyone decades ago.

  1. March 6, 2010

    […] a class lecture on postmodernism last semester my prof remarked that postmodernity “is what it is.” This thread of his discussion basically stated that, while we can’t all agree on exactly what […]

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