Math or English?

Charles

I make my money as a web developer at a tech security company. I chase my passions as a director for the Dallas Junior Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Over the last couple of years I've come to love this city, and I want to see it be as great as it can be. Why am I here?

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2 Responses

  1. First of all, my opinion might be biased since I’ve always hated math (although Dad says I’m good at it).

    That being said, I would really encourage you to go for English. What you said is very true: when you have mastered the English language, and when you’re passionate about it and choose your words purposefully, you can convince almost anyone of what you’re saying. Now that’s power.

    Getting on my soapbox here) Kids these days do not read. It irritates me to no end, but it also makes me incredibly sad. I grew up reading a book a day and loving the ability to sit down with a book and just travel wherever it took me for hours at a time. Now, kids play video games, watch movies that pander to them and convince them of how they’re unhappy the way they are and they need x product to fix it. The only thing a book has ever sold me is a way of life that embraces knowledge and the pursuit of that knowledge. This is what’s missing in our kids’ lives today. I saw a ten-year-old kid in Barnes & Noble yesterday, not perusing the shelves or even the magazine section, but watching a movie on an iPad.

    All this to say, Charles, that you have a passion for kids, and you have a passion for reading. Put those two together, and you can change the way our culture is going.

    P.S. I miss your face around these parts. Drop me an email sometime. đŸ™‚

    • Charles says:

      Your bias is forgiven, go and sin no more…

      So, my first reaction to your second paragraph was, “Hey! What’s wrong with video games!” I may have an inappropriate relationship with my XBox.

      You’re right, though; kids are being acculturated into a media environment that is wholly electronic. It’s centered around TV, gaming, and computers, which each carry a message that opposes the message carried by the book. I’d recommend Postman’s Teaching as a Conserving Activity. It’s much less popular than Teaching as a Subversive Activity, but also much better. He discusses the media environment, and how it affects schooling in particular, but with implications for language and reading.

      Thanks for the thoughts, and you’ll see me soon, I’m sure!

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