This Is (One of Many Reasons) Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

Federal Communications Commission Set To Vote On Net Neutrality

Charles

I make my money as a web developer at a tech security company. I chase my passions as a director for the Dallas Junior Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Over the last couple of years I've come to love this city, and I want to see it be as great as it can be. Why am I here?

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2 Responses

  1. Danita says:

    I don’t really agree with your assessment. What you propose may have happened could benefits the end user not really looking at the point that a large portion of websites on the internet are not owned by Goliath companies but regular people.

    I don’t own a text messaging service, but what I do own are several websites. I am not a smaller company but an individual and the internet is, in reality, made up of several million individuals more so than gigantic companies who can afford that type of legislature. It would take years to get the individual on shared hosting the option to comfortably afford that type of push and I’m not sure those years are worth it. You have to be careful about a monopoly no matter how “good” or “evil” it could turn out to be and I just don’t trust our ISPs enough to have rooted for the risk. In my opinion. And after a glass or two.

    • Charles says:

      You’re right, but you don’t see what I’m saying.

      With the new rules requiring anything called “broadband” to be at least 25Mbps, faster speeds are coming for everyone. So you will get some push. But you’re looking at this like your site, because it isn’t a big company, is going to have it’s bandwidth/speed cut. It wouldn’t. It would be just as fast as everything else is now. Those few big companies would get more speed, but you wouldn’t get less. You’d be right where you are now.

      So yeah, you’d wait a few years for those speed benefits from the shared hosting, but that’s a bonus – an add on to what you have now, subsidized by those big companies. But now those subsidies are not a possibility. So that speed boost is going to take a whole lot longer.

      Think of it like a car: The only car available is a bare bones Chevy Cruze. They get better over time, but it takes forever, because innovation is expensive. So someone suggests making Caddys, and selling them to rich people. That way, they pay for the development of new tech, and when that development gets cheap, it’ll get added to the Cruze. Development happens faster, and it gets subsidized by rich folk.

      NOOOOOO!!!! They can’t have a Caddy if I’m stuck with this Cruze! It’ll take years for me to have access to that new tech, and I’m not sure it’s worth it. Everyone should just have to have the Cruze, and get the new developments together.

      You’ve literally gained nothing, except the comfort of knowing that everyone’s car is as mediocre as yours…and will stay that way.

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